Tag Archives: rant

Keeping it real

Anti-Social social media

As many of you who might read this know, I like social media. I spend a reasonable amount of my spare time following and trying to keep up with the information that is available about SAP, cloud and HCM topics. Many of these social media discussions (a majority I’d suggest) take place over twitter. Now recently I’ve found a few tweets that have really got me irritated. But before I explain what got my back up, it’s probably worth pointing out that there is a simple option for me, and it’s put the phone/tablet down and walk away. This really isn’t that serious! Secondly, don’t ask me to name names, I won’t and I don’t think it’s helpful anyway, and I’ll get to why not later.

What’s wrong?

I’ve seen two types of behaviour that I’ve disliked. Firstly has been where people have been using social media as a tool to strike up a conversation. But rather than continuing with the conversation, just make a couple of snide remarks and tried to spark up a fire. In some cases these have been extreme storm in the teapot scenarios, where some information misunderstood, or not at all researched or understood has been used to derive wild scenarios that are great link-bait but do not actually help drive the conversation forward. Conversations are two-sided, if you refuse to engage in a manner that engenders discussion then you don’t have a conversation, you have a battle. In battles the only people that win are the arms manufacturers.

The second type of behaviour is where people represent themselves as “individuals” but start broadcasting what can only be described as advertisements for the products that the company that they work for sells. Now this is a fine line as you’d expect people to be interested in and excited about the products that they company that they work for sells. But when it is done across a whole group of employees and sometimes with a common message/format  then it really starts to smell bad. Even worse when people start tweeting info and then add link to some sales website or their company twitter handle when the content of the tweet isn’t about that! It’s like they are branding their tweets! But when they then refuse to engage on the marketing type tweets to clarify details (possibly because some of the marketing bs is actual bs?) it gets really irritating.

The problem.

Well my real issue is that the response I want to give the tweets of the second type would just make me an asinine tweeter of the first type. Keeping it real and respecting myself involves not walking either of these two paths. And that’s tricky. Not to mention frustrating! This is why I don’t what to name, it’s just behaving like a spoilt brat and isn’t doing anyone any favours. Don’t be evil!

My solution – not “the” solution

I believe that I shouldn’t take myself too seriously, it’s one of the reasons I still keep the ridiculous twitter image that I have whilst pretty much all those that I engage with have sensible portraits. To remind myself not to think overly of my skills, abilities or influence, as I’m just a silly looking guy who’s biggest achievement was becoming a father. Remembering what is important and valuable to me then drives my behaviour. Yes I’ll post this up to vent a little, but the anti-social social media that winds me up, hopefully you won’t see that coming from this direction. 🙂

Seriously, don’t take yourself too seriously. Photo was taken at my son’s 1st birthday party.

ABAP Code Naming Conventions

Ok, you can probably guess that I’m not the most conventional person. I probably don’t fit the mould of the stereotypical developer either. I’m certainly not what one would call an introvert.

So please take this with the necessary pitch of salt. (especially if you’re one of the people who writes the code naming conventions that I have to follow from time to time 😉 )A pinch of salt required

<rant>

Why on earth does every SAP project I go to insist on such inane naming standards for the code? The SAP editor is a wonderful IDE (caveat I did not say it was the best IDE) that allows you to see the definition of any variable with a simple double click – so why on earth are you so worried that I should prefix all my local variable definitions with an ‘l’? What on earth potential benefit can this have on the code readability? Perhaps it helps if you’re still one of my nemesis developers who are passing all your variables between methods through the use of global variables and/or singletons. Perhaps one needs to look at a piece of code, see lots of l’s and that gives satisfaction? The use of Hungarian Notation in ABAP code seems to be universal, although never it seems implemented in the same way.

Then when I define a structure, I must prefix it with a “S” just so you can be sure that it isn’t actually a table or a single field, or so help me, a woolly mammoth. When I look in the IDE view of the package I am developing, all of these different things are arranged in a tree so you can easily tell one from the other. Again a single double-click can bring me to the definition if it is ever referred to in a piece of code. Perhaps it might save some time looking at a variable definition to see if it is a table, a structure, object reference or a variable – but if I’m in the code, it should be pretty damn obvious! If I’m appending or inserting into it, it’s a table. If I’m referencing a sub-field of it, it’s a structure. If I’m assigning a value to it it’s a variable, if I’m creating an instance of it, it better be an object reference. There again may be cases of my nemeses developers still using tables with header lines and confusing the heck out of me. But I’m hoping that the code inspector might weed at least that out.

Searching outside of the SAP world the use of Hungarian Notation within code is not universally disliked, but with such a clear list of disadvantages and such luminaries as Uncle “Bob” Martin and Linus Torvalds against it, you’d have to proclaim yourself a pretty die-hard supporter of “doing it the old way” not to just think a little – “is this really useful? Or is it even potentially bad?”.

Then there comes the requirement that every object should reference the area of use it is intended for. Thus the forth and fifth characters of the object name must be “HR” or “PA” or “XX” or whatever. The use of Positional Notation for implicit metadata about a component is, however not something I’ve seen outside of SAP projects except for the COBOL example given in the linked Wikipedia page. At this point when reading the naming convention guide, I casually check if there is any mention of packages and package hierarchies and hope upon hope, package interfaces. When there isn’t, I sigh again and just bite my tongue again. Because SAP has provided a wonderful way of helping us see what use a component is put to – as every component must belong to a package, and that package can (and should) have an application component defined. And to give even more clarity, the package can have a super-package, thus grouping all like component together, whatever types they are and where ever in their object names they have a ridiculous two character code. The package interface can even tell you if the object is safe for use outside of the package. What a great concept!

So instead of spending time thinking about whether the components we are building are truly reusable, and what the scope of that reuse is. We spend hours checking if we have the first n characters of our our objects correct according to the development standard book.

</rant>

One day someone will be silly enough to let me do it my way, I’ll confuse the bejeebers out of all the guys who’ve only been coding ABAP badly for the last 10 year and the project will potentially fail because I’ll spend my entire time looking for enough of a development team that can understand that following a rigid way of doing things isn’t always the best way to do it…. <sigh>

Personal link shortening and tracking

<RANT>

Is it really required to use link shortening services everywhere? In twitter or other places where space is premium – sure, I’m happy. But where it doesn’t matter, the only reason they are being used is so that the publisher of the advice about the endpoint can track the number of clicks that they are getting.

I’m not particularly happy about this sort of tracking. To the extent I’ll use a search engine to find the content rather than click the link. Also I’d prefer not to click on the link if it’s just going to take me to a press release – which is obvious when you see the URL, but not so much when it’s hidden by a click counter (oh I mean link shortening service).

Perhaps I should just get over it and let those people who want to crow over the number of clicks their posts are getting get high on their own self importance. I’d rather just share than worry about that and that should be enough.

</RANT>